Bathrooms and Moisture

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David_martin
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Bathrooms and Moisture

Post by David_martin » Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:53 pm

Hi all,

Looking for some advice. I have recently paid £2k for some bespoke furniture for my bathroom. The firm mainly make bedroom furniture. I'm really disappointed with the quality for the money. The equivalent off the shelve stuff would have cost about £750 from somewhere like B&Q but I wanted the units deeper than standard.

Anyway, onto my issue: All the unit carcasses are made out of 15mm p2 grade Egger board. My understanding is that this isn't suitable for bathrooms or areas where there is much moisture. It should be P3 grade moisture resistant. I'm being told by the manufacturer it will be just fine and that they've done loads of bathrooms with this material and they basically aren't willing to discuss the matter any further.

Any views?

thekarter
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Re: Bathrooms and Moisture

Post by thekarter » Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:23 am

Egger's own web site say it all -
Moisture-resistant Eurospan E1 P3 CE with a middle layer dyed green is suitable for all types of coating. This chipboard is used in furniture and interior design as an alternative to the P2 standard coreboard. It is certified in accordance with EN 312, type P3.

Applications
Bathroom and sanitary furniture

I would have used birch ply.
Can you post some photographs?
Alan

David_martin
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Re: Bathrooms and Moisture

Post by David_martin » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:34 pm

Thanks for the response. I'll post some pictures when I get home from work. I spoke with Egger's technical guy today who was really helpful. He said it's all a bit of grey area and there is no real right or wrong.
Ideally P3 should be used but chances are p2 would be fine and that'd I'd be very unlikely to have an issue. Its just very disappointing to have furniture which will likely be ok for a cost of £2k
There is no EN standard that mandates cabinet makers to use the right spec of wood for the purpose its intended only on the manufacturer of the sheet materials to make the different grades.

Potentially there is en14759 but I can't get a copy without paying £98

David_martin
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Re: Bathrooms and Moisture

Post by David_martin » Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:09 pm

Here are some pics, they are three other cabinets 300mm wide that have been took away to be edged and that's it.
Attachments
Cabinet
Cabinet
Boiler cabinet
Boiler cabinet

Meccarroll
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Re: Bathrooms and Moisture

Post by Meccarroll » Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:52 am

Hi David, I can sympathise with you on this, not getting what you want.

The carcass will not necessarily degrade simply because they are not made from Egger P3 grade moisture resistant chipboard, it is going to depend upon how much moisture they are likely to come into contact with and how prolonged it will be before the carcass material starts to degrade. Most professional craftsmen on this site use high quality materials and I would have made the carcasses from durable material with moisture resistance characteristics.

Because you purchased these on a special order it's not a straightforward process to reject them unless they are faulty or unfit for there intended purpose. Kitchens and bathrooms are a place where you would expect moisture to be present but in a lot of cases there is unlikely to be sufficient moisture to degrade free standing units unless they come into contact with water spillages on a frequent basis.

If you do some research you may find mainstream manufacturers do use standard materials (Not specified to resist moisture) for carcasses in bathroom and kitchen furniture while the smaller specialist will lean toward the use of moisture resisting materials more.

The cost between the two is materials is often a small consideration for a specialist craftsman because his labour is usually figuring quite high in the overall cost but large manufacturers work on larger profits with highly automated processes where savings count all around and material savings simply just add to the profit. Egger have an interest in not saying too much in respect of suitability of their materials in this case in particular as they supply the product that is being used by the manufacturer and the manufacturer are saying that they use the material in similar situations and have had no problem. I think it's going to be difficult for you to prove otherwise in this situation. You may have to let this one go for the moment but keep all of your correspondence just in case and do keep in mind the smaller businesses for future reference.

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