ENGLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

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Kacperoo
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ENGLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Post by Kacperoo » Wed Jun 06, 2018 1:50 pm

Hello once again I am writing my bachelor's dissertation but this time I have changed a little bit my topic
ENGLISH AND POLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS.
I would like to make posts with questions to you guys. It is always better to ask someone than reading millions of articles watching videos.
Today three questions:
1. I have found in a book called "The technique of Furniture making" by Ernest Joyce(page nr 100) a plane which looks like a router plane and it is called "Old Woman's Tooth" router. Can someone explain why it is called like this or maybe you have another name for that kind of tool?
2. In a book by Ernest Scott "Woodworking in Wood" there is a chapter with Tools. I have found something interesting the whole chapter is called "CRAMPS" and I know that in nowadays while you are gluing something you are using CLAMPS. Which one of these words do you use in your everyday life in the workshop?
3. Do you know any examples of "old school carpenters jargon"? I have a good example in Polish Jargon could you try to translate this to "old school" ?
“Boy, you are preparing these badges badly. First, align the ends and place the support pads so that you can see where you have to plane, then smooth the entire top with a scrub plane to make it straight, then smooth all the bumps with a block plane and then you can plane with jointer plane Along tree rings? “

Thank you for your answers and I invite you to the discussion :).
Ps. If this post is in wrong category or group please let me know sorry if it is. ;)

mark270981
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Re: ENGLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Post by mark270981 » Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:31 pm

I’ve always used the word cramps instead of the more popular clamps and constantly get corrected.

Old women’s tooth router, I had one of those - helped to cleaned out rebates!
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Kacperoo
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Re: ENGLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Post by Kacperoo » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:15 pm

Do you think "mark270981" that the name is because it looks like an open mouth with one tooth? :) Or any other explanation?
Is there any other name for Saw Set pliers ? i am trying to create a sentence in my imagination something like : " Hey Jim could you pass me the Saw set pliers ?" doesn't sound like a jargon :P

mark270981
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Re: ENGLISH JARGON OF INTERIOR WOODWORKING SPECIALISTS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Post by mark270981 » Fri Jun 08, 2018 4:12 pm

Think Emma Thompson in Nanny McPhee.

I can’t imagine anyone would ask to be passed saw set pliers, these were used (still are) to set the teeth on panel saws, tenon saws etc. I don’t think I’ve ever owned a pair, I’ve used them but never saw the need to buy them.
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Mark - Sutton Coldfield

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